World Media Roundup – 27 October 2014

Categories: In The Media.

Nurses engaged in palliative care get a forum

India – The Hindu

The role of nurses in palliative care sector should be discussed and clearly defined if it has to be improved further, speakers at the inaugural State conference of the Association of Community Nurses in Palliative Care have said.

Quality of US hospices varies, patients left in dark

US – The Washington Post

More than a million times a year, a terminally ill patient in the United States is enrolled in hospice care. Each time, the family confronts a decision that, while critical, often must be made almost blindly: Which hospice to hire?

The everyday challenges of China’s ageing population demand attention

China – South China Morning Post

China’s care facilities can accommodate only around 1.6% of its old people. It’s unrealistic to expect a sudden or massive investment by the government on the provisions. China, after all, is still a developing country.

Courts follow doctors, not families, when it comes to patients’ best interests

Australia – HealthCanal

Doctors’ assessments of whether it is in a patient’s ‘best interests’ to withdraw life-sustaining treatment are likely to prevail over family wishes when end of life matters go before the Supreme Court, a review published in the Medical Journal of Australia has found.

How to offer a “good death” across cultures

Canada – The Vancouver Sun

Given Canada’s cultural diversity and fragmentation, how can hospice staff and others who care for the terminally ill help make possible a “good death” for anyone, whether they’re Christian, Buddhist, spiritual-but-not-religious or atheist?

Euthanasia advocate and cancer sufferer dies after appealing online for a lethal drug

Australia – ABC news

Martin Burgess, an advocate for voluntary euthanasia, who used online video to appeal for a lethal drug has died in Darwin, triggering a police investigation.

Germany grapples with assisted suicide

Germany – Swissinfo.ch

With a proposed assisted suicide law before the German parliament, the emotionally charged right-to-die debate is moving toward a grand finale.

The poison’s still in the fridge, but perhaps I don’t want it after all

UK – The Guardian

In July, sick with cancer, Jo Beecham talked about stashing life-ending drugs in her fridge, in case she wanted to hasten her end. But as the disease wore on, and she received better palliative care, she had second thoughts.

WHO convenes industry leaders and key partners to discuss trials and production of Ebola vaccine

World Health Organization

WHO convened a high-level emergency meeting last week to look at the many complex policy issues that surround access to Ebola vaccines.

Fears that Ebola crisis will set back malaria fight

BBC News

A leading malaria control expert has said efforts to contain the disease may be jeopardised by the Ebola crisis.

“Where will my plan go?”

Palliverse blog

“Much is written about the difficulties faced by health professionals broaching an advance care planning discussion, but comparatively less attention has been directed to the challenge of ensuring that these discussions translate into clinically meaningful differences in the patient’s care.”

Teen appeals to South Africans: “Get me to 21”

ehospice International children’s edition

Jenna Lowe, is a 19 year old South African teenager who has extended an invitation to all South Africans to attend her 21st birthday party. The only catch? You need to sign up to be an organ donor.

Euthanasia; has the term been hijacked?

ehospice Australia

Professor Rod McLeod believes that were there adequate provision of palliative care, instances of euthanasia – including physician assisted suicide – would be minimised.

No reason to skip a dose

ehospice South Africa

HIV and tuberculosis remain leading causes of death in South Africa. Now, Anova Health Institute’s Dr Khanyi Tshabalala responds to the top five reasons tuberculosis and HIV patients give for skipping their daily doses.