Who Cares? We Do! World Hospice and Palliative Care Day 2014

Categories: Community Engagement.

World Hospices and Palliative Care Day (WHPCD) was celebrated on Saturday 11th October across Kenya to match the theme, WHO CARES? WE DO!

Various hospices carried out community engagement activities to enable them understand that palliative care requires everyone’s involvement to succeed.

Nakuru Hospice held a Maximize Life 2014 Cancer Awareness Event where they celebrated cancer survivors with support from The Max Foundation.

Cancer survivors, Caregivers, Doctors, Nurses, Clinicians, Counselors, Volunteers, Spiritual leaders, entertainers, family members, friends and members of the public celebrated the day at the Hospice grounds.

Nakuru Hospice identified the ‘WE’ in the theme as;

  • The professionals, volunteers and carers currently involved in palliative care delivery
  • Venues and Providers – You may receive palliative care in a variety of settings and from a variety of professionals.
  • An interdisciplinary team is comprised of physicians, nurses, carers, personal support workers, social workers, volunteers, spiritual care professionals and many more.
  • Donors and Partners who provide resources to deliver palliative care

Nyeri Hospice celebrated the WHPCD by creating Ostomy awareness in Nyeri County at Loresho to sensitize the public on some urinary and digestive system diseases.

Kimbilio Hospice held its second annual charity marathon to raise palliative care awareness as well as offering free screening to the community that turned out to see the athletes compete for a worthy cause.

Kenya Hospices and Palliative Care Association (KEHPCA) Executive Director Dr Zipporah Ali was featured on Citizen Television’s Strength of a Woman for her passion to see patients with life threatening illnesses free of pain and other distressing symptoms across the country.

Two weeks earlier, hundreds of supporters turned up to support Nairobi Hospice’s 10km walk in Ngong’ Forest to raise funds towards the care of patients with life threatening illnesses, an event that created awareness about palliative care.

The aims of celebrating this day are;

  • To increase the availability of hospice and palliative care throughout the world by creating opportunities to speak out about the issues
  • To raise awareness and understanding of the needs – medical, social, practical and spiritual – of people living with a life limiting illness and their families
  • To raise funds to support and develop hospice and palliative care services around the world.

You may receive palliative care in a variety of settings and from a variety of professionals. An interdisciplinary team is comprised of physicians, nurses, carers, personal support workers, social workers, volunteers, spiritual care professionals and many more.

Find out how you can support palliative care by visiting a hospice near you or contact KEHPCA to find out ways in which you can support palliative care in Kenya.